Categories
Speaker

Suresh Pillai

Suresh Pillai is the Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow at Texas A&M University. He is also the Director of Texas A&M University’s National Center for Electron Beam Research. He is a member of the Graduate Faculties of Food Science & Technology, Toxicology, Veterinary Pathobiology, Poultry Science and the Water Program.

His B.S. degree Botany and his M.S. degree was in Industrial Microbiology. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Arizona in Microbiology & Immunology. In 2018, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Peru’s Universidad Nacional del Altiplano (UNAP). He served as the Chair of the Texas A&M University Professional Program in Biotechnology from 2004-2010 and from 2000-2005, he served as the Associate Director of the Institute of Food Science & Engineering at Texas A&M University. He is a Fellow of the International Forum on Industrial Processes and has served on the FDA’s Science Advisory Board for the National Center for Toxicological Research and the Foundation for Food & Agricultural Research.

His current research is focused on harnessing eBeam technology for a wide variety of applications including the development of vaccines, food pasteurization and the remediation of environmental pollutants. His research is currently funded by a variety of federal agencies including the EPA, the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy and is a subject matter expert for the UN’s International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the US National Nuclear Security Administration.

Abstracts

The Growing Market for Ionizing Technologies in  the Americas

Abstract: There are strict global standards that govern the use of different technologies such as methyl bromide, hot water treatment, and ionizing technologies for treating agricultural commodities in transboundary shipments. Over the past decade there is definitely a shift in switching to ionizing technologies such as gamma and electron beam technologies. There is no better region of the world to see this change taking place than in the Americas  This has resulted in significant increases in volumes of agricultural products that are  being treated by ionizing technologies. In large countries in the region such as Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico, the market for ionizing technologies in the spice, pet food and processed foods is very large. The biggest challenge to faster adoption is the lack of private investment in these technologies. The talk will illustrate the value proposition of these technologies in the phytosanitary applications, in the spice industry, the role of the retailers as well as suggest a path forward for accelerated adoption of eBeam and X-ray technologies.  

The Future Outlook and Practical Considerations in the Adoption of High Energy Electron Beam Technology 

High energy electron beam (HEEB) technology has become a mainstay in the medical device and pet food industries. The adoption of the HEEB in the human food processing industry especially in regions outside of China is still nowhere close to its potential.  Besides the usual regulatory bottlenecks, there a number of logistical challenges associated with the incorporation of this technology into the established supply chains of the food industry.  This talk will  focus on the emerging research areas related to HEEB in food processing as well as highlight the critical need for a diverse array of eBeam and X-ray technology platforms.  

Categories
Speaker

Yves Hénon

YH Consulting
IIA

His career started in 1980 at the Food Irradiation Laboratory of the French Atomic Energy Commission. From 1987 he built and managed large irradiation service centers in France, Thailand, and Malaysia. A freelance consultant since 2006, he also served two years as a food irradiation specialist at the Joint FAO-IAEA Division of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna for which he still frequently works as an expert. He has been the main writer of an E-learning course on food irradiation and a Manual of Good Practice for Food Irradiation. For the International Irradiation Association, he recently created the Phytosanitary Irradiation Platform and drafted a Prospective Accelerator Buyer Guide. He has been a speaker at and co-organizer of numerous international meetings, including the recent International Meetings on Radiation Processing
Mr Hénon trained as agronomist specialized in food technology at the Institut National Agronomique in Paris before his MSc in food science and technology in the U.S.

Categories
Speaker

Alain Strasser

Dr Alain Strasser is Engineer in Nuclear Physics and has got a PhD in Radiation Physics from the University of Strasbourg (France). He has especially worked on the optimization of industrial X-ray targets. He was part of the team that created, 35 years ago, the French Technology Resources Centre Aerial. 

As General Manager, he led this interdisciplinary institute to the highest level of international recognition as excellence center for radiation processing.

He has got, through many industrial and academic collaborations, a large experience in various technical aspects of radiation processing and its multipurpose applications.

Aerial has been designated, in 2016, as IAEA collaborating Centre on the topic “Multidisciplinary applications of electron beam and X ray technologies and related dosimetry, especially for food irradiation”.

Abstract

What can be achieved with food irradiation ?

This introductory speech will present the different positive effects sought by the food irradiation technology, as well as the potential limits with regard to the intrinsic properties of food products.

The keys to the success of such a treatment, based on the concept of absorbed dose by the product, will also be discussed.

Categories
Speaker

Thomas Servais

With a background in mechanical engineering, Thomas Servais is managing IBA Industrial for nearly 4 years. In addition, he is a professor of applied mechanics at the university of Louvain-La-Neuve (UCL).
Having started his career more than 20 years ago, he spent about 9 years in the design and production of aircraft and space shuttle engines. “Able to talk with engineers while being anchored in the field”. During this first experience, he also managed a major Service Hub in the aircraft engine industry.
In 2008, he joined IBA, initially to start, install and stabilize a Manufacturing Team dedicated to Proton Therapy Cyclotrons. He then moved to global R&D to lead the Accelerator Group, serving all businesses from diagnostics to treatment and industrial applications.
He was then appointed to set up IBA’s Research and Advanced Technologies Group, providing projects to fuel the outlook for the coming decades.
He then moved on to his current position, convinced that industrial applications, and more particularly food applications, will benefit more than ever from IBA technology.
He is therefore a committed sponsor of IFIS and looks forward to hearing from you.

Categories
Uncategorized

François Vander Stappen

With a background in electronic engineering and in medical physics, François started working for IBA 12 years ago, in proton therapy. After getting a deep experience on the field, he worked in R&D and led several research programs, aimed at improving the treatment accuracy. 

He joined in early 2020 the IBA Industrial business unit in the product management team. He works at developing a research program in collaboration with Aerial, bringing his experience of medical irradiations to the industrial domain. 

Abstract

Monte Carlo is the state-of-the art technique for the simulation of particle transport, of their interactions with matter, and the dose deposition. It allows to predict the achievable dose uniformity depending on the irradiation parameters and the product properties. An excellent agreement with measurements has been shown. 

In this presentation we will show the potential of simulations, and use them to analyse the dose uniformity ratio for various configurations of products. We will compare the achievable uniformity in E-beam and X-ray. Specifically, we will study the impact of the density, shape and arrangement of food products like fruits and fresh vegetables.

Categories
Uncategorized

Jeremy Brison

Jeremy Brison has been working for IBA in R&D and innovation since 2011. Before joining IBA, Jeremy was a researcher in the field of Physics and Bioengineering for more than 10 years in prestigious universities and research programs. Jeremy attended the accelerated management program at Solvay Brussels School after his PhD in Physics at University de Namur and Post-Doctoral in Bioengineering at University of Washington.  Today, Jeremy manages the Product Management team, in charge of developing the industrial irriadiation solutions and applications of tomorrow. 

Abstract

High energy E-beam and X-ray: an overview of the technical solutions and typical cases of food irradiation

Monte Carlo is the state-of-the art technique for the simulation of particle transport, of their interactions with matter, and the dose deposition. It allows to predict the achievable dose uniformity depending on the irradiation parameters and the product properties. An excellent agreement with measurements has been shown. 

In this presentation we will show the potential of simulations, and use them to analyse the dose uniformity ratio for various configurations of products. We will compare the achievable uniformity in E-beam and X-ray. Specifically, we will study the impact of the density, shape and arrangement of food products like fruits and fresh vegetables.